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  #61  
Old 02-07-2019, 08:19 AM
dhunited12 dhunited12 is offline
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For linear models, TIA is nigh impossible to learn from. He goes into way too much depth on the wrong things (from looking at the F18 exam and understanding the trend against calculation intensive problems) and seems fond of launching into obscure and useless derivations from the Dobson book. I suggest the source text ISLR or watching one of the many excellent stats YouTubers like Ben Johnson or William Press.
Do you suggest dropping TIA for this section in its entirety and reading ISLR? I would rather not go through all of this material then also 400 pages in a textbook for this section...
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  #62  
Old 02-07-2019, 10:47 AM
Mullered Mullered is offline
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Do you suggest dropping TIA for this section in its entirety and reading ISLR? I would rather not go through all of this material then also 400 pages in a textbook for this section...
Ideally it would be both but I gained so much more reading over ISLR & spending time thinking about it than watching the TIA videos. The GLM section is a big part of the reason I passed last fall as I only got 13/15 questions.

The questions specific to the dobson material are much more mechanical. I bought the dobson book but didn't find it that useful in addition to TIA, Lee has you covered on link functions and the like I think.

Also, if you haven't bought the time series book, do that. I relied solely on TIA and got 0 questions correct come exam day (one of which was entirely my fault screwing up an equation). He goes into R and runs code out of the source I believe but you might be better suited doing that on your own.

Not trying to bash the hell out of TIA but that was just my personal experience. It's really fine for a lot of the material. It's still a new exam.
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  #63  
Old 02-07-2019, 11:15 AM
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Do you suggest dropping TIA for this section in its entirety and reading ISLR? I would rather not go through all of this material then also 400 pages in a textbook for this section...
Yes. I wish I hadn't watched TIA because it just made me more confused. ISLR is crystal clear though.

I want to be done with TIA already but the next time I'll possibly use it is for Exam 5 which 1. TIA is supposedly very good for and 2. the employer will pick up the tab for.
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  #64  
Old 02-07-2019, 11:44 AM
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I also like the Cowpertwait Time Series book. It's like ISLR in clarity. TIA time series videos seem to be straight from the book, but the book is much clearer.

I recommend reading the selected chapters in ISLR, Cowpertwait.
Do not read Dobson or Hogg. Exam C passers should have the Hogg material down, for the GLM material you can just find some videos online.
Ross seems quality but didn't really go into depth with it.
Have no experience with Tse and the other materials.

#LIBGEN is your friend.
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  #65  
Old 02-07-2019, 12:41 PM
SwimToAjit SwimToAjit is online now
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What does everyone find useful for mastering reliability theory? That has to be my least favorite topic. The syllabus says the range of weight is 2-8 percent, yet the Fall exam had four questions on it. The CAS seems to love the topic, despite it being totally useless for the profession, IMO, but I digress.

Last edited by SwimToAjit; 02-07-2019 at 12:45 PM..
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  #66  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:42 PM
OdinMode OdinMode is offline
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I know it's a little early for the April sitting, but what are you guys' thoughts on using Coaching Actuaries for MAS-I?
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  #67  
Old 02-07-2019, 08:07 PM
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I like it enough, given the fact that it takes time to build up a really big question bank. So it's not AS good as for the earlier exams.
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  #68  
Old 02-08-2019, 12:12 AM
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ProvidenceOfRisk ProvidenceOfRisk is offline
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Yo! If you want to be an actuary, open up an Excel spreadsheet and start projecting your study hours over the calendar to see what you need. More importantly, if you want to have any confidence, start collecting data on how long it takes for you to complete each, say, section of a manual. Then, take the average after completing 5-10 sections and extrapolate for the entire manual and you have an idea of when you will finish. Thereafter, start thinking about how much time you need for practice exams. If you're like me, it's about 8 hours per ASM Manual Section. That means 8 * 65 = 520 hours. Now, if the ASM manual sucks, you're screwed, but how can you not trust Weishaus? He writes the manuals for everything these days. DO that spreadsheet.
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  #69  
Old 02-08-2019, 10:20 PM
SwimToAjit SwimToAjit is online now
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Am I the only one who thinks TIA gets way too in the weeds on life contingencies? Probably 30% of their material isn’t even mentioned in the CAS study note. I didn’t do well on the Life questions in October, but it definitely wasn’t because I didn’t brush up on the more esoteric topics TIA goes into detail on. Life Contingencies and Reliability Theory were my two worst topics in the Fall, and I’m still having a tough time finding a good source to study with for these areas.
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  #70  
Old 02-08-2019, 11:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwimToAjit View Post
Am I the only one who thinks TIA gets way too in the weeds on life contingencies? Probably 30% of their material isnít even mentioned in the CAS study note. I didnít do well on the Life questions in October, but it definitely wasnít because I didnít brush up on the more esoteric topics TIA goes into detail on. Life Contingencies and Reliability Theory were my two worst topics in the Fall, and Iím still having a tough time finding a good source to study with for these areas.
Yes. We don't need to know all those silly umlauted formulas. Just remember probability of a life x surviving to x + t is l(x+t)/l(x) and of death is just 1 minus that. That's it.
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