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  #31  
Old 07-09-2012, 12:54 PM
clam clam is offline
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Originally Posted by kanpingzhong View Post
I am working in a credit operation, credit risk department of a bank, and want to go in to the actuarial field. I passed 5 exams already, good at excel/VBA and did graduate with degree of actuarial science, but no actuarial work experience. How do I get the entry level and start my actuarial career? I am following some posts here, sending out emails to actuaries I found on soa website, talking to people who are actuaries, looking online job website. What else I can do? Or what should I do?
I also read a post on linkedin about the recruiters don't like unbalanced candidates who passed too many exams, but withou any experience. Is it true? For my situation, it is what it is. I really dont have experience, how do I compete with fresh grads?
You have to sell yourself better. You have more job experience than any fresh grads (this is a fact!). Your excel/vBA skill can be applied in real job situation, not just getting a A+ in the VBA 101 class (this is another fact.) You pass 5 exams and you save company's money (exam fee, study days, etc...).

For company that doesn't value your experience/skill, just forget about them. There are companies out there willing to hire people like you because it saves them training time. Also, your skill/experience in banking industry may inject new idea into insurance. Maybe, you see how people cheat on credit score, and that make you write better insurance rules to close some gray area.

And as a career changer, you just have to accept the fact that your future salary may not be as good as your current one. You will get EL salary (mostly higher range due to exam and experience). Also, you have to prepare to answer why you want to have career change. And hopefully, if everything works right, you are taking a loss in short team, but gaining much more in your actuarial career.
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  #32  
Old 07-09-2012, 01:02 PM
Hojo Hojo is offline
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Originally Posted by clam View Post
You have to sell yourself better. You have more job experience than any fresh grads (this is a fact!). Your excel/vBA skill can be applied in real job situation, not just getting a A+ in the VBA 101 class (this is another fact.) You pass 5 exams and you save company's money (exam fee, study days, etc...).

For company that doesn't value your experience/skill, just forget about them. There are companies out there willing to hire people like you because it saves them training time. Also, your skill/experience in banking industry may inject new idea into insurance. Maybe, you see how people cheat on credit score, and that make you write better insurance rules to close some gray area.

And as a career changer, you just have to accept the fact that your future salary may not be as good as your current one. You will get EL salary (mostly higher range due to exam and experience). Also, you have to prepare to answer why you want to have career change. And hopefully, if everything works right, you are taking a loss in short team, but gaining much more in your actuarial career.


I have nothing to add....that was perfect.
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  #33  
Old 07-09-2012, 01:02 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is online now
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Originally Posted by Peetie Skunk View Post
If only there were an EL advice thread or a Career Changer advice thread. That shit would be very useful.

Too bad the OP can't read the stickies at the top of the page. Otherwise we might have had some good advice for them.
Now, now, don't be like that.








That's my job!
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  #34  
Old 07-09-2012, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Now, now, don't be like that.








That's my job!


I will leave you at it then and mosey on back to my exams forums and the NAT.
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  #35  
Old 07-09-2012, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by AAABBBCCC View Post
You always get more resumes for EL positions. It is not like 100*50. If you are getting 50 resumes for an EL actuarial analyst position then surely you are getting only a fraction of that for higher level jobs and dead end jobs. 50 resumes is nothing. If you make an initial filter based on gpa and exams then you can bring it down even more. I find it extremely sad that you are using nonsense factors to filter through a seemingly small set of resumes.
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Originally Posted by wdgolden View Post
Fifty sounds like a very low number for an EL position. I would guess closer to 250-300 resumes. And the 100 open positions are probably interspersed throughout the company rather than just actuarial positions. Given 100 open positions the majority are going to be lower level positions which will bring in quite a few resumes.
My guess is that 50 is the number of resumes the hiring manager received after HR screened out some of the easy ones. (Like the guy who has no exams and majored in Art History, but is sure he can pass the exams because he never studied and still got an A- in Algebra 2 in high school.)
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  #36  
Old 07-09-2012, 07:48 PM
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twig93 twig93 is offline
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Originally Posted by Peetie Skunk View Post
Methinks there may be some visa issues here.
I'm thinking this as well. To the OP: based on your screen name and a couple of posts saying things that people who grew up speaking English at home in the United States just wouldn't say, I'm assuming that you are foreign.

If you have Visa issues... it's going to be super-tough. Not very many companies are sponsoring right now. If you do not have Visa issues, you need to make that very clear to hiring managers.

You can always try to improve your English. Your written English is very good, but even before the post about going to China, I didn't think you were a native speaker.

Quote:
and for some personal reason
should be "and for personal reasons"

Quote:
I always want to be an actuary.
should be "I have always wanted to be an actuary."

Quote:
try to get some more advices
should be "try to get some more advice"

Quote:
How did you get first job?
should be "How did you get your first job?"

Is your meaning perfectly clear such that a coworker would have absolutely no problem understanding you? Yes.

Am I being super-duper nitpicky in even bringing this up? Yes.

Could very-good-but-less-than-perfect English skills make a difference to a hiring manager who has bad memories of taking multi-variable calculus from the visiting professor from China whom he couldn't understand at all? Yes.

As I said, your English is very good. It could be even better. Doesn't hurt to work on it.
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  #37  
Old 07-09-2012, 08:02 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is online now
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"Nit-picky" is more like calling out an obvious typo. Calling out four instances is called "teaching."
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  #38  
Old 07-09-2012, 09:45 PM
kanpingzhong kanpingzhong is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clam View Post
You have to sell yourself better. You have more job experience than any fresh grads (this is a fact!). Your excel/vBA skill can be applied in real job situation, not just getting a A+ in the VBA 101 class (this is another fact.) You pass 5 exams and you save company's money (exam fee, study days, etc...).

For company that doesn't value your experience/skill, just forget about them. There are companies out there willing to hire people like you because it saves them training time. Also, your skill/experience in banking industry may inject new idea into insurance. Maybe, you see how people cheat on credit score, and that make you write better insurance rules to close some gray area.

And as a career changer, you just have to accept the fact that your future salary may not be as good as your current one. You will get EL salary (mostly higher range due to exam and experience). Also, you have to prepare to answer why you want to have career change. And hopefully, if everything works right, you are taking a loss in short team, but gaining much more in your actuarial career.
Thank you. My concern is how to get such EL position. The salary cut is ok.
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  #39  
Old 07-09-2012, 10:34 PM
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George L. Costanza George L. Costanza is offline
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Originally Posted by AAABBBCCC View Post
Yes. You should work on that.
They still let you post in this section?
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  #40  
Old 07-10-2012, 12:21 AM
kanpingzhong kanpingzhong is offline
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Originally Posted by twig93 View Post
I'm thinking this as well. To the OP: based on your screen name and a couple of posts saying things that people who grew up speaking English at home in the United States just wouldn't say, I'm assuming that you are foreign.

If you have Visa issues... it's going to be super-tough. Not very many companies are sponsoring right now. If you do not have Visa issues, you need to make that very clear to hiring managers.

You can always try to improve your English. Your written English is very good, but even before the post about going to China, I didn't think you were a native speaker.

should be "and for personal reasons"

should be "I have always wanted to be an actuary."

should be "try to get some more advice"

should be "How did you get your first job?"

Is your meaning perfectly clear such that a coworker would have absolutely no problem understanding you? Yes.

Am I being super-duper nitpicky in even bringing this up? Yes.

Could very-good-but-less-than-perfect English skills make a difference to a hiring manager who has bad memories of taking multi-variable calculus from the visiting professor from China whom he couldn't understand at all? Yes.

As I said, your English is very good. It could be even better. Doesn't hurt to work on it.

yes, thanks for the advice. I appreciate it. No, I don't have the working visa problem. I don't know if I am using an inefficient way of job hunting, but I don't see many EL opened.

Last edited by kanpingzhong; 07-10-2012 at 12:25 AM..
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