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  #1  
Old 04-05-2013, 12:03 AM
kameldinho kameldinho is offline
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Default internship in claims department ---> actuarial department?

So my question here is how can I make this switch?

Background:

Junior in college, had every intention to go to grad school until I took Real Analysis and saw what math was really about. [Translation: I like working with numbers not greek letters]. Always had the actuarial thing in the back of my mind and eventually decided to take a pop at it. Plan on taking FM first since I understand it has a longer syllabus so I'll use the summer to study for it. In addition my college doesn't have a class in Financial Math but I will be taking Probability theory next semester so just another reason I decided to permute the exam sequence (Lol).

Dilemma:

I have an internship (more like a temp position) shuffling papers in the claims department at a reinsurance company. Nothing fancy but it adds lines to my resume. I know where the chief actuary's office is located and I guess I could walk in and introduce myself but I have a few concerns:

1)I'm not sure how my current supervisor will interpret this (in the event that he finds out)

2)I'm not sure how the Chief Actuary will respond...especially since I haven't passed any exams as yet

I was planning on waiting until I passed FM before I made a formal approach but I may not be around that long. The fact is that I have the ability to arbitrarily walk into the office of a Chief Actuary at any given time (something I know many people on this forum would kill for) but I am a bit hesitant that it might be interpreted as being overzealous and possibly overstepping boundaries.

The actuarial department isn't in the same vicinity as claims so it would be very difficult for me to fish around and harass the actuarial analysts for some background info on the guy, and possible tips on how to get on his good side.

So how do I go about doing this?
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  #2  
Old 04-05-2013, 12:33 AM
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Brock Brock is offline
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Talk to the analysts. Otherwise, you face a 'Why is this db in my office while I'm on an important conference call?' situation. This is an office, and people have work to do. Despite what you learned as a child, the world does not revolve around you. Given that you punked out when confronted with Greek letters, I'm not convinced you can pass your first exam. You are most likely better suited to work in claims.

Congrats on your first post, and good luck with FM.
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  #3  
Old 04-05-2013, 12:42 AM
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vjvj vjvj is offline
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CA might not the best person to be talking to for internships and EL hires, anyway. Others in the actuarial department might be a better choice, so don't think of it as fishing for CA info.

Be respectful of everyone's time, not just the CAs. The first words out of your mouth should be "Hi. Are you busy?" and you should listen carefully to the answer.
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  #4  
Old 04-06-2013, 06:42 PM
kameldinho kameldinho is offline
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Thanks for the responses.

Its not that I don't like greek letters, but rather I just don't like epsilon-delta proofs (I'm not keen on proofs in general). I'm aware that practically all serious math books use greek letters to represent variables and I have no problems with that as long as i get to crunch numbers at some point. After two semesters of analysis & measure theory I have practically forgotten how to use a calculator.

I managed to exchange a few words with an analyst in the elevator. He basically said talk to the CA. Also thanks for the tip about understanding other people's time. I spent most of my life wanting to be an academic and talking to other academics I'm used to walking into a prof's office and talking for 30mins on a regular basis. Clearly this isnt something to attempt in a corporate setting, so I will keep that in mind.
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Old 04-06-2013, 08:22 PM
TheShark TheShark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kameldinho View Post
Thanks for the responses.

Its not that I don't like greek letters, but rather I just don't like epsilon-delta proofs (I'm not keen on proofs in general). I'm aware that practically all serious math books use greek letters to represent variables and I have no problems with that as long as i get to crunch numbers at some point. After two semesters of analysis & measure theory I have practically forgotten how to use a calculator.

I managed to exchange a few words with an analyst in the elevator. He basically said talk to the CA. Also thanks for the tip about understanding other people's time. I spent most of my life wanting to be an academic and talking to other academics I'm used to walking into a prof's office and talking for 30mins on a regular basis. Clearly this isnt something to attempt in a corporate setting, so I will keep that in mind.
Don't worry about not being able to pass actuarial exams just cause you don't like greek letters. Actuarial exams have nothing to do with proving analysis BS. In fact, I would question a candidate's interest in the actuarial field if s/he is in love with pure math. Academia is a better place for people like that.
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  #6  
Old 04-06-2013, 10:11 PM
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JohnLocke JohnLocke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kameldinho View Post
Thanks for the responses.

Its not that I don't like greek letters, but rather I just don't like epsilon-delta proofs (I'm not keen on proofs in general). I'm aware that practically all serious math books use greek letters to represent variables and I have no problems with that as long as i get to crunch numbers at some point. After two semesters of analysis & measure theory I have practically forgotten how to use a calculator.

I managed to exchange a few words with an analyst in the elevator. He basically said talk to the CA. Also thanks for the tip about understanding other people's time. I spent most of my life wanting to be an academic and talking to other academics I'm used to walking into a prof's office and talking for 30mins on a regular basis. Clearly this isnt something to attempt in a corporate setting, so I will keep that in mind.
I disagree with Brock. A ballsy move like this in a humble and likeable way has always worked for me. You need to be very careful and socially savvy but it could be very worthwhile. If it was me, I would do it.

People love genuine compliments but not butt-kissing. Something like "Hi I'm X and I work in claims. Actuarial work seems really interesting. I know your time is precious. Could I buy you lunch sometime to talk about..."

Seriously, what's the worst that could happen? You don't work for him. He can't fire you. Even if he could, is being a claims intern that great? Do it, IMO.
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  #7  
Old 04-06-2013, 11:12 PM
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George L. Costanza George L. Costanza is offline
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Take advantage of the internal job postings while you are there if possible. Everyone prefers hiring someone that is already in the company.
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  #8  
Old 04-08-2013, 11:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kameldinho View Post
until I took Real Analysis and saw what math was really about.
lol real analysis. You're not alone.
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